Scissoring With The Wave

Article By Linda Healy

For dog groomers who love to scissor, this information may come in handy.  If you learned what works and doesn’t work when scissoring various coats by trial and error over the years, you know that the technique used on a straight coat will have extremely different results when used on a curly coat., wire, or fine coat. Chalk this up to the wave pattern of the hair.

The Wave pattern describes the amount of movement (wave) in a hair strand. This information is good to know, if you are a scissor loving Dog Groomer!

Cutting Straight Coat

When cutting the straight coat, every ‘scissor cut’ can show, and leave marks in the coat. Subtle textured technique and blending, can help to prevent the cutting lines.

  • For fine straight hair, avoid using texturizing techniques as it may not achieve the desired result.
  • Medium straight hair can have lots of volume and body and suits most techniques.
  • Coarse straight hair may benefit from texturizing and thinning out techniques to remove some bulk and improve the result and style
  • Cutting Curly Hair
    When cutting curly hair use a wide-toothed comb and use freehand cutting techniques.
  • Soft curly hair can have a combination of textures to consider; it may be frizzy in appearance and have lots of body.
  • Tight curly hair can also have combined textures and will spring up after the hair has been cut particularly on fine curly hair.
  • Very curly Soft, very curly hair is often very fragile, Comb the hair gently using a wide toothed comb and use a conditioning spray to prevent discomfort.
  • Wiry curly hair is also very fragile but can have less of a defined curly pattern. Avoid techniques that texturize the hair and use mostly club cutting and freehand techniques.

Cutting Fine Hair
Fine hair is limp and often lays flat to the body, yet all fine hair can be easily transformed to give the illusion of fullness and movement using cutting and styling techniques!

  • More than any other type of hair, fine hair needs to be cut on a regular basis to keep the shape and ends looking full.
  • Blunt cuts will maintain weight around the perimeter to create the dimension and the illusion of more length.
  • As fine hair tends to break, notch cut the ends for more of chiseled and chunky look to help camouflage any stressed ends, use a shorter shear for notching so you don’t go too deep into your sections.
  • Keep layers long so there is more volume in the body and fullness at the ends

    Tip Parting the hair at a diagonal to the spine, before barber rolling, or layering, will impart more volume than parting the hair straight back to the spine.

Easy Texturizing technique

Freehand Notching (picketing)

This texturizing technique is a great way to get limp head hair to stand up on yorikis and westies.

Method 1

Step 1: using a straight or thinning shear

Step 2: Lift section of hair between fingers

Step 3: Cute small notches of hair at random intervals with the tips of the shears.

Step 4: Repeat as needed until the shorter hairs support the hairs above it and allow the hair to stand upward.

Method 2

Step 1: Lift section of hair between fingers, take a vertical section and it elevate horizontally

Step 2: Using a Blending or straight shear, complete three angled cuts into the elevated section of  hair, at the very end.

Step 3:  Position your shear at an angle,

Step 4: Close, and slide the scissors making 3 diagonal cuts at the end of the section, about ⅓ the height of the hair.in depth.

Step 5; Comb and repeat as needed

Watch for more scissoring tips soon to come.